Saturday, September 19, 2009

THINGS FALL APART (Skeeter Vs, Supertroopers)



The District Commissioner reveals something about himself in the last scene of Things Fall Apart: he is planning to write a book about his experiences with the Ibo. As he orders his men to cut down Okwonko's dead body, he daydreams that "one could almost write a whole chapter on Okonkwo (sic)..." There is dramatic void between his intellectual assessment of the situation and the passion extinguished by the violent end to Okwonko's life. What do you think the Commissioner would include about Okwonko in his book? Write me a hypothetical paragraph in the Commissioner's. Consider his interest in the episode and his perspective on its meaning. Due September 25.
UPDATE: REVIEW THE ENTRIES BELOW FOR STYLE, POV, CONTENT. CHOOSE THE ONE YOU FEEL IS BEST. CUT AND PASTE IT INTO A WORD DOCUMENT, AND COMMENT ON WHY YOU JUDGE IT SO HIGHLY. MLA FORMAT. PRINT IT OUT. DUE AT THE END OF CLASS TODAY. IF YOU CHOOSE YOUR OWN, IT HAD BETTER BE GOOD.

61 comments:

  1. Okonkwo was one of the Ibo tribe’s leaders. He seemed to always want to kill us. It frightened many of our converts, but we knew God was with us, always protecting us. We got hi back and the other leaders that defied God by asking them to come to a meeting and then arresting them. One of my court messengers shaved their heads, this added to embarrassment. As men of God we forgave them after the payment of 200 bags of cowries. The leaders, including Okonkwo went back sulking. I found it interesting how Okonkwo didn’t attack us even after holding him captured. The Igbo tribe decided to have a meeting about what we did, it was of no consequence to us, but I sent my messengers anyways. I didn’t want the tribe to form an army and attack us. My head messenger was blocked by the big oaf. One of my messengers said he looked very unhappy. Once my head messenger said, “The white man whose power you know too well has ordered this meeting to stop.” Okonkwo drew his machete and killed my messenger. When I received the news I made haste to his compound. I found his friends there, I asked for him, but only got the response he is not here. Angered by there lack of answering I threatened them that I would arrest them if they didn’t hand him over. They just said we can take you to him but we need help. I was puzzled by their answer. I soon found out what they meant. The big oaf hung himself. His friend Obierika said to me that it was my fault that he killed himself. I was still speechless from what I saw to answer. My men cut him down. I left before they did. I want all to know that I would never participate in any undignified detail, my credibility depends on it. After he died, it seemed as if that was the end of the Ibo people. I hope for his sake, that God takes pity on his soul.

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  2. Okonkwo was a man of many titles within the Ibo society, One of my translaters told me, "Okonkwo was once at an even higher position within this land he had many titles that he gained by his buttocks." After my translater said this all of the people in the Ibo culture burst into laughter, I was slightly confused at this sudden outburst. Out of my own experiance with the man Okonkwo I have seen him as nothing more than a common brute, although many of the men of the Ibo revere his courage and determination as thte great wrestler of his tribe. He has burned down our buildings and I later arrested Okonkwo and the other leaders of the tribe. As I got word of the news that my messenger was freed after they were set free I was furious. I came to arrest Oknonkwo only to find that he had hung himself in what I could only see as desperation. It was a shame that a man of such honor would not adhere to our beliefs. He may have proved to be a valuable asset in our conversion process of the Ibo people.

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  3. Just as the conversion process was going well, a native man by the name of Okonkwo tried to fight us as much as he could. He was a rather strong man who was well know throughout the village and was of high ranking. I think he would of been a great man if we got him to convert. People would of followed his lead. He has already slain one of our messangers. I arresed him and 5 others. However, the Ibo people paid the 250 schells unfortunatly. But a few days after we had to cut his lifeless body out of a tree. It was a terrible thing to see. He left his family and his whole tribe. He seemed like a man who liked things the way they were and didn't like change. I really hope that we didn't cause him to take his life. I would feel bad, but only for a day or so.

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  4. During my time in Africa, I met a very interesting man. He was of a very primitive man and lived in one of the villages that me and my men were trying to convert. His name was Okonkwo and he was one of the leaders of the clan. He seemed to be one of the most rebellious men in all of the Igbo Tribe. Many of my men feared him. I was soon to have his whole village converted and he seemed to be that only defiant man left. I had just returned from my tour when my brother in God, Reverend Smith, came to me in great unhappiness. I explained to me that the Okonkwo and the other tribe leaders had burnt down the church. I called a meeting with the leaders of these primitive people. Okonkwo was one of the men invited. Little did they know, when they arrived at the meeting in my headquarters, they would be arrested for their atrocity against the one and only God. We released the men when they payed a fair amount of money. The next morning, word came to me that a meeting was taking place. I immediately sent my messengers to stop the meeting. I soon came to hear that this man named Okonkwo had killed my messenger with his machete. Now, it seemed obvious that Okonkwo was a very influential man among the neanderthals. I knew I must take care of him, but to my convenience, he had taken care of himself. I went to his hut only to learn he had hung himself. Bringing civilization to these simple people will take some sacrifice, but it is sacrifice in the name of the one true God. Interesting that such a seemingly strong man would act so weakly. Their leaders are not capable of running these villages. Life in these undeveloped regions is really almost unpredictable. These people are so lucky we came to bring order to their lives.

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  5. Okonkwo was a bold man. He often put brawn before brain. I respected him for these attributes, but had to show my authority at the same time. I captured the fierce warrior and five other tribe leaders. I ordered my men to shave their heads and exert physical abuse as well. We then placed a 250-cowry bribe to the Ibo tribe, to show our newly discovered dominance in Nigeria. The loyal men and women of Umuofia paid the fine, and I released the detainees. As Okonkwo looked at me while taking his exit, I knew I hadn’t seen the last of him. A few days later, I was told one of my men was without his cranium, and it was at the hands of Okonkwo. I had no choice but to order his execution. I traveled to his hut, only to find the coward hanging from a tree. A friend named Obierika requested that we dispose of the disgraced corpse. Respecting the tribe’s traditions, we removed the body from the tangled noose, and carried it off to be laid in the earth. It’s quite a shame for such a noble man to end his life in a pusillanimous manner.

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  6. My time in Africa was spent interacting with new and interesting people. One such person was a member of an Ibo village named Okonkwo. He was a man of high status in his tribe and well respected. However he was stubborn and refused to follow the lead of others and convert to the one true God. One day he took part in burning down one of our churches. The next day I called a meeting with various leaders of the tribe, including Okonkwo, and took them by surprise when I had them arrested. They were later released on bail. Soon after, I sent a messenger to the tribe to try and stop a meeting I heard was taking place. I couldn't afford to let them stage a rebellion. When the messenger arrived, Okonkwo murdered him with a machete out of pure frustration. Once I heard news of this event, I went to his hut because I knew I had to stop him before someone esle was hurt. I was shocked and appalled by what I saw. When I arrived, his friends took me around back behind his hut only to show me that Okonkwo had hung himself from a tree. How can a man so strong of spirit commit such a weak act? It was clearly an act of desparation and confusion. If only he was open to change and turned to the true God where he would have found a chance to start anew, all sins forgiven. He would have been a valuble addition to our cause.

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  7. During my stay in Africa, I came across a man by the name of Okonkwo in the Igbo tribe. He was a popular man throughout the Igbo and was a tremendous warrior. Many of my men feared him since he always seemed like he was out to kill us but we kept praying for his soul, hoping that he would realize that there is only one true God. Sooner or later, we had to arrest some of the tribe members for burning down a Church and defying God. As punishment for their crimes, we shaved their heads and demanded pay back with 200 bags of cowries. After the incident, the tribe had a meeting to talk about what had happened, so I decided to send my messengers to stop the assembly. I returned to their village, after receiving word that Okonkwo murdered one of my messengers with a machete. When I arrived, I demanded to see Okonkwo to arrest him. The villagers kept telling me "he is not here . . . he is not here!", so I threatened to arrest them. They finally agreed to take me to him but said they needed assistance. They led me to a tree where the man hung himself. It's a pity to see a man who had everything going for him to just fall apart in a matter of moments. This man, Okonkwo, sinned against God by committing suicide and I hope that God may have mercy on his soul in the after-life.

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  8. I had already converted many clans and rid them of their ridiculous beliefs by this point in my mission. Throughout my travels in Africa, I had heard that the Ibo are a very primitive tribe who value warriors, strength, and courage. After I had sent missionaries to Umuofia, they told me about one man who particularly exemplified these characteristics. His name was Okonkwo, and he had been a leader in Umuofia (until he was exiled). Considering all of my knowledge about the crude customs of Africans, I knew that these barbarians would not only accept this man, this murderer, back into the clan, but that they would still respect him as a leader. Therefore, I believed that he would be a valuable asset to my cause because many would follow his lead. However, I soon realized that any attempts to convert this stubborn, uncivilized native would be futile; I mean, he was called the "Roaring Flame" for a reason. For example, Mr. Brown had gone to talk to Okonkwo about his son's new religious education and Okonkwo had driven him out of the hut and even threatened him! My interpreters further assured me of Okonkwo's temper and violence when they informed me that Okonkwo was encouraging the rest of the clan to use violence against us. While I was away on tour, those uncivilized natives who had not yet been converted adhered to Okonkwo's wishes and burned our sacred church down! Obviously we had to punish them for this heinous act, so we locked Okonkwo and the other leaders in a cell for several days. Apparently these Africans have horrible tempers, because, after he was released, Okonkwo killed one of my messengers in his rage. This was the last straw for me; I knew I had to take care of Okonkwo because he was a hopeless cause for conversion. Conveniently enough, Okonkwo had committed suicide, saving us the hassle of having him hanged. Obviously I had to leave while the body was cut down, because that would give the clan a negative view of me, but I felt confident that the rest of the clan would be easily pacified and converted now that that barbarian was out of the way.

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  9. “It must be some kind of idiotic, prehistoric tradition,” I thought as I walked out of the dirty, foul “obi” or so they call it. Why on earth else would a man of his nature decide to hang himself? I must say I was quite distressed to see this Okonkwo fellow go however. He was a very promising man who would have had so much potential as a Christian. If only he gave it a chance he would have seen that it was the right path. I had some things planned for him once he realized all this oracle worshipping, “Evil Forest” obsession was nonsense. With his ability to make people listen and his stature that pulls followers, he would have made a wonderful preacher. True, he was completely wrong in the murdering of the messenger but God is merciful. In time, with penance, he would have seen the error in his ways and that the one true God will forgive him. But at times I think that maybe it was right for Okonkwo to depart from us. After all, he was a “king” or something of the sort among these unfortunate peoples. And one must agree they are extremely uneducated and in desperate need of help and regeneration. These sad, ill-fated villagers might be better off without someone so strong willed and stubborn as Okonkwo. Yes, we must move on from the past and look ahead to the bright new future that is to be Christianity for these primitive peoples. They will have a better future with or without the direction of Okonkwo whether they like it or not.

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  10. Okonkwo was a very well known man, being a Igbo tribe leader. His reputation preceded him from village to village. He was more infamous in our village than famous. But although we were frightened by his stature, we always had faith that God was there to protect us. Surprisingly after his capture due to his defiance against God, he did not attack us, he had a mellow demeanor about him. Consequently, the Igbo planned a meeting to discuss our actions, and although it didn't matter to us, I did send some messengers. Unfortunately, Onkonkwo intercepted the effort to stop the assembly, and killed my head messenger. In the honor of my men, I traveled to the village and insisted on Okonkwo's arrest. The villagers did not know of his whereabouts, until one man took me over to a man hanging by a rope tie to a tree. A pity to see a sinful man try to escape sin itself.

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  11. Of my time in the tribes in Niger a certain event bears mention. There was man who displayed great ferocity in his defense of his false religion and defiance against the church. This man even went so far as to take the life of one of our christian members, a messenger none the less. I heard from one of the escorts that a messenger had just been murdered by a tribesman. After finding out the name of the murderer from the people of the tribe who had converted I assembled some men and we went to arrest him. I was lead to him by some of the tribesman and to my surprise, found his body hanging from a tree. The tribesman told me that they could not take him down because it was against their custom. You see, they explained to me that his body was evil, and only strangers could touch it, because he had taken his own life, which was an offense against the Earth. I ordered my men to take down the body, not doing it myself you see, being that I must refrain from lowering the people's opinion of me, and headed off. I found it odd how a man who so strongly defended his culture and religion, who could even kill for it, would do something that brought him to clash with it. This man I have spoke of was known as Okonkwo.

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  12. After my return to Umuofia, I learned that the natives had burned down the church. We have brought so many improvements to their lives and have tried to educate them, yet the villagers continue to be disrespectful despite our valiant efforts to civilize them. The village of Umuofia has been the most difficult of the nine villages to pacify. Had we known that previously, I would have assigned Reverend Smith here first, rather than have Mr. Brown introduce Christianity to this tribe. In order to address the burning of the church immediately, we requested a meeting of their leaders and as expected they showed up with their machetes. We had no choice but to handcuff them, jail them for several days, then fine their village a penalty. The morning after the prisoners’ release, we sent a group of court messengers to break up a gathering of the villagers. Suddenly, one of the Umuofia leaders we had imprisoned named Okonkwo, grabbed his machete and killed one of our messengers. Okonkwo was a very strong man with a stern face and looked to be middle aged. He seemed to be an important individual to this tribe although I cannot understand why since he was such an inconsiderate brute. Okonkwo was the only violent savage that I encountered in the village of Umuofia. He showed extreme aggression to our people. Fortunately none of his friends and fellow leaders showed the slightest inclination towards supporting his violent actions. Because he murdered one of our men, we had no choice but to apprehend him. We gathered a group of men to capture this rebellious barbarian, anticipating a possible uprising. When we arrived at Okonkwo’s compound, we found the beast had already committed suicide and was hanging from a tree. Much to our surprise, the other savages with their illogical customs, would not touch Okonkwo’s body. At least these primitive natives also agreed that suicide was a terrible sin. Their customs and traditions did not allow them to properly bury Okonkwo’s body because they feared that his body was full of evil. Once again, our people had to do the thankless jobs to keep the peace among the uncivilized natives. The pacification of these primitive people continues to be an enormous challenge.

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  13. When we arrived at the tribe of Umuofia, it was recognized immediately that some of the tribe members would be difficult to convert to Christianity. Of them all, there was one man who sacrificed his life due to his beliefs and how loyal he was to them. His name was Okonkwo. He was a highly admired man of great status in the tribe. From the beginning he was resilient, unwilling to compromise despite our peaceful demeanor. I admire his loyalty to his religion, culture, and tribe, but Okonkwo was a very violent man. If a situation did not go his way, he became uncontrollable. Even when many o fhis friends and his own son converted, Okonkwo stayed stead-fast to his tribes' beliefs; not giving Christianity and God a chance he continued to stay close-minded. Unfortunately this brought upon his downfall. Because of his and other tribe members’ resilient attitudes, we had to use force to attempt to open their eyes and hearts to God. Okonkwo, realizing he could not win, committed suicide by hanging himself. This deeply saddened me because I believe if he would have let Chrisitanity and God in his life, his strong nature would have made him one of our most devout converts.

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  14. Okonkwo was a man from the Umuofia tribe in Nigeria. He was a man of noble status and well known throughout his tribe because he was a fierce warrior. He was a man who seemed to use violence and murder as a way out of a situation which made him a sinner in the eyes of God. My men and I only wished to bring justice to the unruly men of his tribe. They sinned greatly and they needed to pay. Instead of realizing their faults and paying the simple amount of 200 bags of cowries, they were in a state of rebellion. Okonkwo was the most rebellious. Even when he was released he and his men gathered into a meeting to talk about war. He was firing up his people and slowing down our conversion process. When my men ordered his meeting to be put to an end so any more violence was prevented, Okonkwo killed one of my men. This violent man had no remorse and it seemed as if he had no faith, only in himself. Converting him would be impossible. The best thing for him, I decided, was to arrest him and put him in jail so he could at least stop sinning and ending the lives of good, faithful people. So I went looking for him and when I came to his hut some men had gathered. I asked them where Okonkwo was but they refused to tell me. How dare they toy with me when I am looking for a murderer?! Finally, they led me to him. He had hung himself from a tree. I was not too shocked or saddened by this at all. He is now under the judgment of God and may God have mercy on him. A violent end to a violent man. I must admit, however, that I learned a great deal from this primitive warrior; there is a lot I could write about him.

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  15. Okonkwo was always one of the stubborn ones in the tribe. He was a leader with many important titles, and he was greatly respected among the Ibo people. When I saw him hanging from a tree, dead, I felt sorrow for the tribe but also somewhat relief. He would be out of the way and would not keep turning more and more of the tribe against the converts. The tribe of Umuofia was by far one of the hardest tribes to try to convert. The leaders, especially Okonkwo, were very stubborn. Even after we captured many of the main leaders (Okonkwo included) and held them captive, Okonkwo continued to rebel. We thought we had taught them a lesson! I will be able to right about this leader and how determined he was to fight Christianity. The Ibo people will be upset but the death of this man will make it far easier to convert new Christians.

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  16. Throughout my career as the District Commisioner, I have never seen such an idiotic African. Okonkwo, as they would call him, committed a suicide. What his intentions were I cannot comprehend. Perhaps he wanted to die a martyr to arouse the belligerent side of the tribesmen. But why would anyone do that? Christianity is the answer. Christianity had advanced mankind. Christianity is better than their regressed religion, in fact, Christianity is progress. I am here to make life better for those tribesman. They can thank me later and I know, in my heart, that civilizing those tribesman would be better for the country, economy, and mankind.

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  17. During my time in Africa, I met a very interesting man. He was very primitive and lived in one of the villages that my men and I were attempting to convert. His name was Okonkwo and he was one of the leaders of the clan. Okonkwo, a native villager, was a very bold and primitive man. He was a man who did not think before he acted. It became apparent that he was one of the most rebellious men in the Ibo village. Many people feared him and that was to change. When I found out that Okonkwo and the other tribe leaders had burnt the church down, I saw an opportunity. I called a meeting and invited the leaders of the tribe, Okonkwo being one of them. To their surprise they were arrested for their intolerant behavior against the one and only God. After their bail was paid off by their people, they were released. The very next morning, I heard there was meeting being planned. Soon after my attempt to foil their plans, I was told that a man named Okonkwo had killed my messenger with a machete. At this point, his time on earth was to be short-lived. In an ironic turn of events, Okonkwo settled the problem himself. He saved me the job of revenge by hanging himself to a tree. I found it interesting that a man of such power and rebellion would act like such a coward.

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  18. During My time in Africa I experienced a true and animalistic native tribe, the Ibo Tribe. I met a man who was true mystery to me his name was Okonkwo. He was of high status in his tribe and was a firm believer in his beliefs. He was a strong fighter but also had a short temper. When I spoke to his tribe of of the Christian God he was unwilling to convert or take in what I had to say. I did not understand how a man could reject the one and only true divine God.On an ordinary day Okonkwo decided to burn one of churches down. The church was the home of God and a place for others to come to pray and worship. I could not comprehend how such a person could sabotage such a divine place. To justify this terrible act I called a meeting with Okonkwo and other members of the tribe and to their surprise I arrested them but eventually I did release them. A couple days later I sent a messenger to the Ibo tribe because I was informed of meeting the tribe was having on the idea of rebelling against me. To my astonishment I found out that my messenger was murder by none other than Okonkwo. To hear this news I knew I had to take matters into my own hands. I immediately went to the tribe to settle this. When I got there the tribes-people took me to the body of Okonkwo. He had hung himself. I was surprised beyond belief. I did not understand how a man I once thought as a strong warrior took the weak and easy way out. I felt sadden that Okonkwo never had a chance to meet God. Yet I somehow believe my God is not a punishing God and well someway accept Okonkwo into his divine paradise.

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  19. As the District Commissioner, I have my respects and questions about the personality of Okonkwo. I respect him for being such a strong individual and not letting anyone tell him what to do. He made himself be the person he isand is so driven to never show fear. It is a great attribute that he only shows the feeling of anger and no other emotions. However, this man has many downfalls. The fact that Okonkwo does not sho and compasionate or understanding feelings he comes across to us as a very harsh individual. He seems to be a senselss man, and is driven by hate. For example, when the Igbo had a meeting we sent one of our misionaries to spy on them. However, once Okonkwo found out that our spy was there, Okonkwo took two swings with his machete and killed him. Later on, Okonkwo committted suicide and killed himself. Although the villagers must have been very upset, I feel that the death of Okonkwo was for the better. His senselessness must not be missed by his village.

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  20. I was so surprised when I first met Okonkwo. He was the most stubborn amongst his tribe, as well as rebellious. Also amongst his tribe, he was the most difficult to convert to Christianity. Okonkwo was a man overcome by violence and war. In the eyes of God, he was a sinner who needed to be found. He had no remorse and showed no mercy when he killed one of my men out of anger. Finally, I concluded that the best solution for Onkonkwo was to put him in jail. When I went to search for him, his men would not tell me where he was. The men finally led me to Onkonkwo, but I found that he had hung himself! If only this man had accepted the word of God! I must admit I am very happy that the Umuofia tribe is not living among such a terrible man anymore. If he had been around for any longer, it was inevitable that they would face much danger. I hope now that the Igbo people will now come to see the face of God.

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  21. Okonkwo was a brave man, trying to keep his village's traditions. I don't think the people of his village knew exactly why he committed suicide. I think the tribesmen believe that he just did it just to end his life, not for a cause. Okonkwo was very stubborn. He killed one of my messengers, the savage beast. Their village had to pay for their sins. 200 bags of cowries, that was our bargain. We captured their leaders, thinking that would sway them into paying us, but that failed. The Igbo tribe as a whole should have heeded the word of God and converted to Christianity. They would have done well to do so. After all, maybe just listening to God would have made all their tragedies not come to fruition.
    --Ice Cold Slurpee

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  22. During my stay in the Lower Niger I came across a man who appeared to be an influential clan leader in the tribe of Umuofia. His name was Okonkwo. He was a well known man because of his fierceness as a warrior and no-nonsense leadership expertise. He was one of the few that defended his false religion to the death. I imprisoned Okonkwo and several other leaders of Umuofia one day and demanded a ransom or else their leaders would be hanged immediately. Needless to say they payed it very quickly and Okonkwo and his fellow tribesmen were released. Right after he was freed, I thought all was going to be well and the villagers would concede to my missionaries. But, that stubborn Okonkwo tried to fire up his companions in a meeting with all of the Umuofia clanspeople, but to no avail. All he did was kill one of my messengers and infuriate the crowd of his once-loyal clansmen. He was alone now. I got very irritated that he lost his temper and killed my messenger so I went to look for him. What I found a little while later was a man, dressed in his war garments, hanging from a tree. I though to myself, "what a cowardly way to die for a man who lived so nobly to preserve his culture".

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  23. Persuading people to convert to Christianity was never an easy task, no matter what kind of people we encountered. I can honestly say that I have never, even to this day, met a more stubborn tribe than the Igbo. I feel that this was solely because of one man, known to his people as Okonkwo. He was a headstrong man, strong in physically and in his beliefs. I knew from the moment i saw him he would be the greatest challenge thus far. During the time that followed he had managed to burn down the church and kill my messenger. Naturally, I had to take action. I had him, as well as four other leaders, arrested. I told the people they would be free if 250 schells was paid. To my disbelief they paid, and every man was set free. For the safety of my people I decided to visit Okonkwo and settle things once and for all. Upon my arrival at his hut I spoke to a few of his friends who informed me that he was no longer there. Confused, I later learned that this was because he hung himself from a tree. I can honestly say that I had not expected this from the great, couragous Okonkwo. You could say that I was a tad disappointed by his decision to leave his people and his family. Nevertheless I knew with him gone the rest of the tribe would soon convert. His body was removed from the tree, and I continued on to preach Christianity.

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  24. During my entire stay in the village, there was hardly a more puzzling character than Okonkwo. He was strong-willed, tough, resilient, and rebellious. Coming into this, we had foreseen challenges and difficulties, but we hadn't really expected to meet someone like Okonkwo. It finally came to a boiling point when he killed one of my messengers. It was a ruthless murder; he felt no regret to why he did it. Upon hearing this news, we traveled to the village for his arrest. Alas, we were too late; he had hanged himself from a tree. It was quite a peculiar scene. No one wanted to touch him; apparently it was some custom that since it is an abomination to take one's own life, the village cannot touch the body. I had my men do it, only to be attacked by one of Okonkwo's friends. Supposedly I had caused this man to commit suicide. Somehow it was my fault. Never again will I put myself in that situation again. I'm not entirely sure how the rest of our stay will go, but I know there will be tons to write about.

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  25. In the small, uncivilized village of Umuofia lived a man named Okonkwo. He was a ferocious warrior and had an enormous temper. Okonkwo was a simple-minded man that could not comprehend the concept of Christianity. He led others in the burning of our sacred church and stuck to his sinful and polytheistic ways. Never have I met such a man so easily enraged. In order to spread the word of God Almighty to the people of his village and to punish them for destroying the house of God, I had to call a meeting to discuss this serious matter. When the villagers arrived with machetes, I quickly decided to tell my guards to handcuff them to prevent a scuffle from breaking out. A debt of 200 cowries was the price they had to pay to be forgiven for sinning in the dominion of the queen. When the cowrie was paid they were released from custody, but soon after they were given freedom Okonkwo committed the worst of all sins. He murdered our messenger that we sent to the village to prevent any uprisings. When I went to bring Okonkwo into custody, I discovered that he had committed suicide. We had to cut his body down from the tree that he hung himself from. It was a very sad sight, but this man was evil and he was the last person standing in the way of converting all the people of the village into Christians and bringing civilization to all of Africa. In a way his death was salvation for his people.

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  26. I have journeyed a great deal in my life. But my time among the Ibo people has been the most significant. While living among the Ibo people, I learned the traditions of the land, the religion, and of the people. One in particular, a man of the name Okonkwo. Though I have seen many distant lands and peoples, Okonkwo will forever be ingrained in my memory. He was a fierce man who devoted everything he ever had to be the greatest man he knew how to be. He was both feared and respected by the tribes people. Can some sort of fear always be found with respect? He resented my men for bringing religion and change to the Ibo tribe, he would not allow them to leave the old ways behind. He and the elders of the tribe burnt down our church as a final sign that change was simply not needed here. Yet, in some way, I both fear and respect Okonkwo for his actions. He was being the only leader he knew how to be, a leader of authority.

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  27. Super Troopers BH.

    After the incident concerning the murder of my messenger I wanted to punsih those responsible. I set off to capture the monsters that did this. I wanted to embarrass them before killing them so i would have shaved their head and made them endure physical pain. The fact that these monsters had murdered one of my friends hurt me deeply. When i arrieved in the village i asked one of the Neanderthals where to find the murderer. He argued for awhile and would not tell me where he was. Enraged i forced him to lead me to the place. I saw a body hanging from the tree. I thought justice had taken care of itself. I orderd the Ibo to take down the body but they refused, saying that it was bad luck. So I had my men cut it down, i couldn't infulence the peoples vision of me. The good thing was that i wouldn't have to deal with their rebelliousness anymore.

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  28. MR Skeeters
    Okonkwo was a very loyal brave man. He kept true to his beliefs no matter what and he refused to become a Christian. When i feared that there would be a rebellion i sent out a messenger to try to stop this from happening however my messenger was killed out of anger by Oknkwo. I then arranged a meeting where i captured Oknokwo and and five other tribal members. I told them if they wanted to leave here alive then they would have to pay 250 cowry bribe iin order to leave. When it was paid only a short time later I was told that another one of my men had been ruthlessly murdered and I had no choice other than to order the execution of Oknokwo. However to my dissmay I was told that he had already commited suicide and his body was to stay and decay inside the evil forest. I then had to order my men to cut him down from the tree since the tribal members were by their religion not allowed to touch that body.

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  29. Okonkwo was rather the more stubborn and most hard headed one of the tribe. Being the District Commissioner, I have my respects and my curiosities about this tribal leader. I very much respect him because he never lets anyone get to him, be it positively or negatively. I say this because Okonkwo is his own person and he shows no feeligs of compassion, understanding, or love. The feeling that he displays is anger. This is good because he is so headstrong to be the best warrior that there is. However, I question most of his behavior. It is also bad that he does not show many feelingsand by not revealing hem it makes Okonkwo a senseless indivdual. As an example I will use the time when the igbo had a meeting: the Igbo tribe had an important meeting and we sent one of our missionaries to go look in on what they were saying in the meeting. Once Oknokwo found out that hey were being spied on, Okonkwo took his machete and killed our missionary with two slashes. Although the death of Okonkwo was very tradgic for the Igbo people, I think that his death benefitted more people than not. I know this strong warrior is missed among the Igbo tribe, but i do not think that his stubborn and senselessness is.

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  30. Upon arriving in the village of Umuofia, I met a man by the name of Okonkwo. To me he seemed to almost contradict himself. One moment he was an excellent leader, a role model for all in his village, then the next minute he's beating one of his wives senseless. He was one of the main obstacles that faced us while trying to convert the village. We tried to convince him to convert, but our attempts had failed. When we had captured many of the village leaders they continued to resist and rebel, this made Okonkwo commit suicide. We believe this will make our conversion of the tribe easier.

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  31. A lot of my time was spent in Africa talking and meeting new people. In the mix was a person named Okonkwo. He was well-known, had a high status in society,and was well-respected. He was very controlling because he would not allow other people convert to the one true God that they believed in. he even showed how stingy he was by burning down churches. I called a meeting the next day which Okonkwo did attend and I had him taken into custody. People who were loyal to okonkwo paid for him to be released. After he was released Okonkwo had a meeting. I sent a messenger to break up the meeting but Okonkwo killed my messenger with his machete. There was no way that I was letting him get away with this. He did this as an act of cowardness and later killed himself.

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  32. Okonkwo was a very courageous leader and noble man of the Umuofia clan in Nigeria. He had great leadership skills and natural physical gifts. I would have to question Okonkwo's character for he seemed merciless. When I had reached the village I felt a sense of fear in Okonkwo for the extinction of his beloved former clan. After he had killed our messenger there was no turning his life around no matter what was done. Anxious to understand his reasoning of the killing and to arrest the once noble clansmen I visited his compound. When I arrived, the people outside would not reveal the location of Okonkwo. After moments of pleading they revealed the suicide of Okonkwo of himself hung on a tree behind his hut. This action seemed to be expected after all that had happened to a man whose life had high hopes but fell apart.

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  33. During my stay in Africa, I came across a man called Okonkwo. Okonkwo was a brusque man who belonged to the Ibo clan, the tribe that I was attempting to convert. I found him to be a very interesting man for he was different from the rest of his clan. He was very tall and was a fierce warrior. As we tried to convert his people in believing in our God, he resisted by burning down our church. I was hurt that this man could be so cruel. The next time we came into contact was when I called a meeting with the leaders of the Ibo tribe. We arrested the leaders when they arrived but the faithful tribe payed the 250 cowry bail. Unfortunately, Okonkwo chose to seek revenge on us by killing our messenger. I now knew that I had to do something about this man's rage. We returned to the village to capture the monster but when we arrived his people told us that he was not with them. We soon discovered that Okonkwo had hung himself in a nearby tree. Although he did horrible things, I believe that if he had let God into his life, God could have saved him from this unfortunate event.

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  34. the natives here in Umfomia are clearly not as intelligent as we from the civilized world are. they partake in silly dances and are constantly trading what seem to be sea shells with each other. they are hot-tempered and barbaric. they are so uncultured that one of their leaders thought it would be perfectly acceptable to behead one of my finest men. boy, did he think wrong. at first hearing of this horrific deed i marched, leading my finest men, right into the black mans home and demanded him to confront me and pay the consequences for his actions. he must have heard rumors about my power and heavy-handedness from his friends because as i was lead around back i saw the stupid black man dangling from a tree with a noose around his neck. the fear of what i would do to him when i finally caught him must have driven him to the depths of insanity and consumed his soul entirely. what was his name again? Ah! who cares. it doesnt matter, he was just a silly black man. one less person i have to worry about....

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  35. CM SKEETERS
    As District Commisioner I have met several people in my life. One of the people I remember the most was a man by the name of Okonkwo.Okonkwo was senn as a king to his people, very strong and shown no signs of fear inside him. When arriving to Umofia, I came only to bring peace to the people. A church was built for the Ibo people and great progress was made throughout the village. I had to arrest some of the people from the village for burning down the Church (influenced by Okonkwo) and defying God. I was arresting these people for the crime they commited immediately. As punishment for there crime, we shaved their heads and demanded 250 bags of cowries from the village. When the news came to me that Okonkwo had killed one of my messengers I immediately left to arrest him. After finding Okonkwo hung from a tree and told that he commited suicide I was surprised. Its a shame that this man commited suicide because he could have continued leading his people within the newe religion that was brought to his village. Mabye now the villagers will not be distracted and continue to bring about the new religion.

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  36. I was called by God to go out and preach his word to the non-believers. I knew my call to evangelize would not be an easy one. I realized there would be struggles along the way, but with God on my side I could face anything, or in this case anyone. In my travels, I came across a village they called Umuofia. Similar to the other villages I visited in Africa, the inhabitants were heathens that worshipped many false gods and participated in obscene rituals and traditions. But I was not there to understand their beliefs; I was there to convert them to Christ, the one and only God. I showed them the power of God through preaching, teaching, and even using medicines to heal. Many in Umuofia began to realize that my knowledge and healing power came from God. Because of this, many converted. But of course, you always have those troublemakers that go against the grain and have a hard time dealing with change. One of these rebels was named Okonkwo. He was a leader in Umuofia who did not want to see his village convert to the “white man’s” religion. I did not pose a threat to Okonkwo or his people so when I learned of Okonkwo’s secret meeting and burning of God’s sacred shrine, I had to take action. I immediately requested to have a meeting with Okonkwo and his men. This meeting was to be peaceful, but when I saw that they came armed, I knew I had to do something. I made them shave their heads just as all the converts in the village were asked to do. I imprisoned them until they paid a sufficient amount for what they had done. Many of these men lost hope and eventually stopped trying to push us out of the village…except for Okonkwo. One day I had my messenger relay a message to Okonkwo, but out of rage Okonkwo killed him. It was almost as if he had lost his mind. I came to confront him about this murder, so I had the villagers lead me to where he was. The villagers led me to where the body of Okonkwo hung. This man had committed suicide because he had lost all hope and could not stand the fact that his village was changing (for the good I might add). Although any death is unfortunate, I have to admit I was relieved when I saw his body dangling there. Without Okonkwo, Umuofia could finally be converted and my mission would be complete.

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  37. As soon as i met this man Onkonkwo, one of the most influential men in the Igbo Tribe, I knew he would be trouble.
    He resulted in voiolence for any situation and did not cope well with change. One of those violent times was when he killed our poor messanger boy.
    I knew it was going to be a dificult task to convert Onkonkwo but we did not give up on a child of God.
    His son Nwoye was among one of the first in the tribe to convert to Christianity causing Onkonkwo to dismiss him.
    If he had not been of such high rank in his tribe our mission of conversion would have been accomplished much faster.
    In the end, all of his efforts to drive us away were a waste.
    He proved to be just as weak as his father Unoka as the pressure from his tribe drove him to suicide.
    As we removed his limp body from the tree I felt somewhat relieved that this man, that was so well known, had been eliminated.
    This allowed us to complete our mission.

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  38. As i made my return to Umuofia, i discovered a very unsettling occurrence. A man, Okonkwo, had hung himself in order to escape punishment. He had problems with the law before when he burnt down our church but he continued his violent streak. I truly have no idea why a man who held so much power in the village would be compelled to commit such great acts of violence. My best guess is that he believed one of his "gods" told him to do all this. Well at least with him gone the people should do away with their false gods and convert to Christianity. It is only a matter of time that they realized it is what is best for them.

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  39. We viewed Okonkwo as a highly regarded, strong man of the Igbo society. We decided we would target him and make it a priority to convert Okonkwo because it would seem as if everyone else of his kind would follow him. Okonkwo and some people a part of his clan were handcuffed and thrown in jail for having armed machetes and guns while they were near us. A little afterwards they were bailed out by their fellow clansmen as they paid 250 bags of cowries. Later Okonkwo abandoned his family and friends and we found him as he hanged himself from a tree. It was ashame that one of the highly respected leaders of the Igbo society decided to hang himself before we could convince him to convert.

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  40. On my journey to Lower Niger in my efforts to spread the word of God, I came across a most intriguing man. Okonkwo, leader of the Ibo tribe. I do not know whether to respect this man or to hate this man. He is a pillar of strength, a fearless leader, a merciless fighter; some of the greatest attributes men throughout history strive to attain. It seemed nothing could stand in the way of this ruthless being. He slaughtered my messenger, moving that bloody machete in a lethal way such as I have never seen before. And still, I thought nothing would stop the brutality of this beast… but I was wrong. Perhaps his greatest attributes became his greatest downfall. When his own flesh and blood turned their backs on him and his war, he turned his back on them, on his family, and on himself. He swung from the tree that day. Although his clansmen would not touch his body, they reluctantly showed me to where his corpse dangled from the bark. Even in death, his expression was as stone cold and heartless as when he was alive. So do I respect this man of the Ibo for his power and strength? Or do I hate the man for his ruthless, sinful nature? He may have killed my men, but he inspired my soul. If only God will show compassion on his soul for the evil he has committed.

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  41. All my travels throughout africa and i haven't come across any man like Okonwko. He had this certain edge to him that I couldn't get a read on. We started slow in Umuofia, but overtime the converts started coming. After all his hustle and bustle Okonwko seemed to be the only man left that was still pushing for his original beliefs. His aura of being a leader is no step short of great. He was physically unparalleled and had the cunningness of a fox. If it weren't for him burning my church down i would of given the guy a break. Okonwko wouldn't ever let change come to be in his reign. He was a man of immutability. In the end he couldn't stand seeing the changes in his hometown. I somewhat respect Okonkwo for what he stood for

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  42. Okonkwo was one of the toughest challenges I have ever faced. When we brought our message of the one true God to the people of Ibo, they slowly began to adopt our beliefs. However Okonkwo became a great obstacle in the conversion of this tribe. Once being a powerful member of the tribe, Okonkwo had a strong influence on his tribesmen. Despite our best efforts he would not except the truth of our message. In fact he fought our efforts every step of the way. It is today that i have discovered that Okonkwo has taken his own life. While I am truly saddened he has committed such a grave sin as suicide, I must admit I am somewhat relieved. Hopefully along with his death so too will the old beliefs of the Ibo people die, so that Christianity will finally be able to take hold here.

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  43. During my stay with the Igbo people, I came across a man named Okonkwo. He was a very stubborn, violent man who saw my work to convert his people as sever threat to him and his culture. I was simply trying to save these people and to be as civil about it as possible. Okonkwo and his people were the uncivilized ones, bearing arms in what should have be a peaceful meeting. He and his clansman were jailed and were later bailed out. Some time later, Okonkwo killed one of my messengers in a fit of uncivilized anger. Ultimately, he took his own life. I guess the burden of things changing was too much for him to handle. Too bad he didn't realize that conversion was all for the best.

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  44. It was clear that the Igbo Society was in need of a serious renovation. I saw it as my duty to bring order into their lives and educate them about God, leading them away from their false gods and beliefs. But Okonkwo, a stubborn, rebellious, yet highly respected tribal leader saw it as his duty to protect the traditions of the Igbo Society. He did not fear me and my men like the others, and impressed me by the amount of courage and dedication he directed towards his religion and people. But his rebellious nature and violent actions caused me many hardships. He burned down my church, disrespecting my religion and followers. I had him thrown in jail and demanded 250 cowry for his release. To my disappointment, the Ibo people faithfully gathered 250 bags of cowries, giving me no choice but to release him.
    The next day I received news about a meeting being held by the Ibo Tribe. Fearful that they might plot against me I sent a messenger to stop it. Later I was informed that Okonkwo had murdered my messenger with his machete. Outraged, I knew the only solution was to get rid of Okonkwo, permanently. But when I entered his hut, I was shocked to find Okonkwo hanging from a tree. Never did I imagine that to strong, fearless Okonkwo would kill himself. I felt as if a weight had been lifted off my shoulders. I can only hope that the Igbo people will learn from his mistakes, and follow my direction towards God and a better, more sophisticated way of living.

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  45. Okonkwo was a man of the Igbo tribe with a great faith in his original beliefs. He would have been a great example to convert to our cause, and would have brought many others with him. We tried to show him the way of Jesus Christ, but he refused and was greatly angered that his other men did not follow him. He was a powerful fighter who strongly fought against our cause. He even savagely killed our messenger, which still disturbs me to this day. Afterward he hung himself. I believe he did it out of desperation, a terrible feeling for a tormented soul. Okonkwo could not cope with the changes coming to his people. Sadly, he thought that using violence and in the end giving up were the only way to cope. I greatly wish we could have saved him, and showed him the true path to salvation.

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  46. During my stay in Africa, I came across an interesting man named Okonkwo. He was the most determined and tough person I had ever met in Ibo. I had heard from every man in the tribe, his main concern in life was to not become a failure like his father. Yet, in my eyes, that is what he became. He could not and would not grasp the faith of Christianity. He kept to his pagan ways. He disrespected the church by leading people from the tribe in burning it to the ground. As a result, I had to call a meeting for punishment. He had disgraced the Catholic faith and committed the terrible crime of killing our innocent messenger. When he was to be taken into custody, I was told that he had committed suicide by hanging himself from a tree. I went to see the body. The tribe men told me that could not take the body down for it was evil because had taken his life and this was a sin. So I had my men do it. I could not so the clan members would not think less of me. I just turned and walked away. It was such an awful sight; a man so strongly rooted in success lowered himself to nothing.

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  47. Okwonko was a strong man. He was a well-known warrior and leader of Umuofia. However, he wasn’t perfect. He was careless, impetuous, and had a terrible temper. He did not welcome change. When I tried to convince him to convert, he refused to leave his old ways behind. As a way of showing his disgust he committed a terrible sin. He murdered our messenger! When I went to take him into custody for committing this crime, I found him hanging from a tree. He had taken his own life. It was an unfortunate ending for an authoritative figure however, it was the ending that he choose. He thought he was doing the heroic thing by killing himself. In regards to this aspect, I respect him for showing others stand up for your beliefs.

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  48. One man i will never forget from the Igbo tribe is a man known as Okonkwo. He was well Known among his people and wwas a very traditional ibo man. Asour movent was beginnnig to take root in the community it was apparent he was opposed. He took the life of one of our messengers and continually showed hisaggression. He was a man who didnt like change. I beleive he felt we were a threat to his way of life and saw us as an invading force. It was fortunate that the men in the tribe did not fight as though it was anotherone of their tribal conflicts. Okonkwo could have caused distaster for our movement if he did not hang himself.

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  49. What to say about Okonkwo... I've never met such a despicable man in my life, and never would I have thought I would stumble across such a person during my time in Nigeria. An incredibly stubborn man who poked at my skin until I couldn't handle it anymore. A conversation with him could never happen unless he was fully armed with his tribe. Perhaps if he wasn't so difficult to convert then things would have been different. However, he was an incredible warrior and I send my respect on that note. But despite that, he committed the greatest sin known to us. He took the easy way out and left us to find him. Of course I had men take his body down because I couldn't bear to do it myself. This man had great potential and he destroyed it all the day he took his life.

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  50. When I set out on our mission to Umuofia I anticipated for it to be a strenuous journey. But I did not expect to encounter someone as difficult as Okonkwo. He was a strong and well respected figure in the Igbo tribe. We would have done well to earn his approoval of our spreading of Gods word but Okonkwo did not enjoy our presence amongst his people. His power to sway the opinions of the other tribes people prevented us from converting them. Okonkwo burnt down our church and killed our messenger. He then commited a grave sin by killing himself. His death sent a wave through the Igbo tribe. They seemed shocked but also became more subdued. They might have felt this way because the most powerful man in their tribe has been turned agaisnt himself in trying to turn away from God. His life had caused our teaching to fall on deaf ears but his death has opened them to Gods word.

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  51. Through my travels of Afica to the village of Umuofia I met the most interesting man. His name was Okonkwo and he surprised me of his knowledge of his community and culture. He was a very stubborn man when I tried to convert him to the christian faith. Trying to convert Okonkwo made him very angry to the point of killing our messenger. Due to this terrible act, he was taken into custody. I was finally told that he committed suicide and had hung himself from a tree. This was such a tragic ending for such a well rounded man. I will always remember this man for his love of his village and culture.

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  52. When I arrived at the Umuofia troop, I could tell easily that there were some people who were really hard to deal with and would be very hard to be introduced into Christianity. I saw a man who was very different from each other. He was like a tiger which is full of anger but he didn’t show off that much. Then I knew his name-- Okonkwo, who was well-known by his powerful strength and his reputation. At the beginning, we showed our peaceful demeanor, but he seemed to be so stubborn that he refused to give a chance to the God. Even his eldest son turned to God’s side but he could not. So we have to brought some forces to let them see the beauty of the God. However, when things did not go as he imagined, even went the opposite side, he was becoming uncontrollable and violent. I felt like that he was going to do something. Finally that day came. We discovered that Okonkwo ended his life by hanging himself. This behavior was considered full of sin so that nobody was allowed to touch his body. I felt extremely sad for him because he was so royal to his own tribe, religion, and culture that when he could not stop the “aliens” changing their religion, he chose this method to show all of us his determination to fight against us till the end of his life.
    What a man!

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  53. The first time I had heard of Okonkwo, my church was burned down. I believed he was bad news. I was trying to help the people of Umuofia see the light of God. Okonkwo took extreme offense to my actions. He made it very clear by burning my church and killing my messenger. I had a meeting with him, but it did not change his views. He also showed resentment toward me and the followers of God because he thought we took away his social status. But the truth is that he took it away from himself. He paid the ultimate price by taking his life. I hope God will show him forgiveness

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  54. We might have had an easier time converting the people of the Igbo tribe to Christianity if it wasn't for Okonkwo. Okonkwo was a stubborm man striving to create and represent the men of Igbo in a better light then his father. He was a man of strength. Not only physically but in his mind as well. Often making major decisions for the clan. If we had him on our side, I feel that many more men in this tribe would have converted to Christianity. It was sad however, that Okonkwo was so close minded as to not listen to our views. Therefore, he was never able to accept God and live a life of everlasting peace.

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  55. We may have come closer to our goal of converting the Igbo tribe to Christianity if it hadn't been for Okonkwo. Okonkwo was a very proud man who held many titles. His goal was to be more productive and popular than his father, who many considered lazy. He was successful with a family of three wives as well as a successful farm owner. Okonkwo was not only strong physically, but intellectually as well, often making decisions for the clan. Imagine our shock and dismay the day Okonkwo was found hanging from a tree. He would no longer have the opportunity to become a Christian and live an everlasting life with God.

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  56. I have traveled to many far places to spread the word of the Lord. As District Commissioner I felt I had the difficult responsibility in converting the Ibo tribe, a tribe I came across while traveling through Africa. This tribe was extremely close knit and protective over each other. The leaders of the tribe were stubborn in learning what I tried to teach them about the one and only god. The thought I was foolish and that their many gods were sure to curse me for my preaching. One of the most persistent natives was a man name Okonkwo. He was a fierce and brutal man, known throughout his clan for being the greatest wrestler of his time. I thought this man was a fool and didn’t know how to accept change or control his madness and fury. The tribe was getting worried when many villagers started to convert to my religion. They burnt down our church, and defied the one true God. My followers and myself had captured Okonkwo among others for this devastating act of violence. Surprisingly this man did not fight back this time. The leaders of the tribe held a meeting to discuss the activities that had been happening, so I sent one of my messengers to stop them. Later I had found out they murdered my messenger. Furious, I went to see Okonkwo at his obi. His friends said that he wasn’t there and that they needed my assistance to find him. It turned out that Okonkwo had hung himself. I feel great sorrow for the death of any man, especially one who had overcome so many obstacles and had such great potential for the future of his tribe.

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  57. I have traveled to many far places to spread the word of the Lord. As District Commissioner I felt I had the difficult responsibility in converting the Ibo tribe, a tribe I came across while traveling through Africa. This tribe was extremely close knit and protective over each other. The leaders of the tribe were stubborn in learning what I tried to teach them about the one and only god. The thought I was foolish and that their many gods were sure to curse me for my preaching. One of the most persistent natives was a man name Okonkwo. He was a fierce and brutal man, known throughout his clan for being the greatest wrestler of his time. I thought this man was a fool and didn’t know how to accept change or control his madness and fury. The tribe was getting worried when many villagers started to convert to my religion. They burnt down our church, and defied the one true God. My followers and myself had captured Okonkwo among others for this devastating act of violence. Surprisingly this man did not fight back this time. The leaders of the tribe held a meeting to discuss the activities that had been happening, so I sent one of my messengers to stop them. Later I had found out they murdered my messenger. Furious, I went to see Okonkwo at his obi. His friends said that he wasn’t there and that they needed my assistance to find him. It turned out that Okonkwo had hung himself. I feel great sorrow for the death of any man, especially one who had overcome so many obstacles and had such great potential for the future of his tribe.

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  58. In one of the Ibo villages, among the Umuofia clan is a barbaric man called "Okonkwo". This polygamist is the epitome of the stupid and needlessly violent African tribesman. His first instinct in almost every situation is violence. He is personally responsible for the gruesome deaths of two innocent children. He did deliver for his multiple families though, as much as a barbaric tribesman can. He was one of the key figures in the clan's primitive society as well. It says a lot towards the tribes of Africa that this sort of man can be looked up to and idealized. His death was just a quick conclusion to what would have been a slow and pathetic decay.

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  59. MJL Super Troopers
    A great leader of the Ibo people under me when I was District Commissioner was a man named Okonkwo. He was known as a fierce leader and strong fighter. But, his weakness was his temper. Okonkwo did not agree with the Church building missions in the villiages or the new government under my command. After a disagreement between one of the Ibo tribesmen and an Ibo convert from the mission Okonkwo convinced his people to burn down the church. They attacked and destroyed everything in the compound. Even though nobody was hurt during this attack and the priests were spared, I still had to punish them. So I invited Okonkwo and other tribe leaders to a meeting at my courthouse. After I had them all in one room, I had my guards come in and arrest them. I explained why I had to do this and that they would be released when their tribe had paid a fine. I kept my word and after the tribes had brought the payment I askd for, I set them free. The next day I heard that the tribes were getting together for a meeting. Not wanting to have an uprising on my hands I sent a few of my messengers to go down there and tell them to disperse. A little while later all but one returned and they told me how Okonkwo had cut him down with a machete after the meetinf had been ordered to stop. This was a serious matter so the next day I took a squad of soldiers to Okonkwo's home. Out front was a group of men and when I asked them where Okonkwo was they told me he was not home. After threatening them with imprisonment, they took me to him. Okonkwo had hung himself from a tree. They told me it was a crime against the earth to take your own life and they could not cut him down. I ordered my men to do it and as they did I wondered about how dedicated this man was to his tribe. I didn't agree with all that he did. But, the fact that he could not bear to watch his tribe change their way of life was astounding. He would rather die than obey my rule. To the Ibo people this man was like a hero.

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  60. Hi Mrs. Healey. #1 Healey fan here. (Joe Bizz) Hows it going

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